Spruce up the landscaping of your CHAMPAIGN/URBANA HOMES with a garden! After those long winter months, gardens are a great way to add a bit of color and cheer to your yard. You can ensure gardening success during the warmer seasons by turning to plant varieties that naturally grow throughout the Midwest. As an added bonus, native plants require less maintenance. Here are the 15 top native plants for Midwestern gardens!

 

SPIDERWORT (Tradescantia sp) – These perennials will blossom with three-petaled flowers in the spring. They can be placed anywhere throughout your garden, whether in the sun or the shade.

 

SWAMP MILKWEED (Asclepias incarnata) – Attract monarch butterflies to your garden in the summer with these pink beauties. As an added bonus, this resilient plant can thrive in average growing soil.

 

COMPASS PLANT (Silphium laciniatum) – Growing up to 9 feet tall, this stunning plant blooms yellow, sunflower-like petals. Interestingly, the Compass Plant naturally aligns itself north to south allowing it to conserve water throughout the summer.

 

WILD ANEMONE (Anemone canadensis) – Add a lovely border to your garden in the spring with Wild Anemone. This plant grows easily in moist soil and will blossom with lovely, large white flowers.

 

PALE PURPLE CONEFLOWER (Echinacea pallida) – With pale pink petals and dark red cones this beauty adds color to your garden in the summer. It will naturally spread across areas of your garden due to the fact that it will self-seed.

 

BLOODROOT (Sanguinaria canadensis) – For shady areas of your garden, plant the Bloodroot. In early spring, there will be beautiful white flowers arranged in the shape of a pawprint. By summer, however, the plant's cycle has ended.

 

JACK-IN-THE-PULPIT (Arisaema triphyllum) – Since the Bloodroot goes dormant in the summer, plant Jack-in-the-Pulpit in the same area to maintain interest throughout your garden despite the season. Also thriving in shaded areas, this unique green flower is hooded and reveals little red markings inside. In the fall, red berries also appear for continued color.

 

BUTTERFLY WEED (Asclepias tuberosa) – This resilient plant resists droughts, disease, and pests! Its beautifully bright orange flowers attract butterflies in the summer months.

 

LITTLE BLUESTEM (Schizachyrium scoparium) – This native grass will add beauty to your garden all year round! In the spring and summer, the foliage is blue-green. Starting in the fall and lasting throughout the winter, this plant turns a stunning purple-bronze.

 

POPPY MALLOW (Callirhoe involucrata) – A perfect addition to the front of your garden, this low growing plant blossoms with wine colored flowers. It can grow in dry soil, lasts several seasons, and resists pests!


PENSTEMON (Penstemon digitalis) – Returning every year to your garden in the summer, the Penstemon grows up to 2 feet tall and blossoms white flowers among its burgundy colored leaves.

 

COLUMBINE (Aquilegia canadensis) – Hummingbirds and butterflies will flit among your garden when you add this plant. These delicate yellow and red flowers will flourish in the shade or sun.

 

CULVER'S ROOT (Veronicastrum virginicum) – Make sure to always water the Culver's Root. These white flowers will grow in light shade and attract butterflies.

 

GOLDENROD (Solidago sp) – Keep your garden looking lovely throughout the fall with this plant. The golden-yellow clusters of flowers need full sun and well-drained soil.

 

BLUE SAGE (Salvia pitcheri) – Add this perennial to your garden for a splash of lovely sky blue in the early fall. Blue Sage thrives in growing conditions similar to the Goldenrod.

 

Adding these beautiful blooms to your landscape and gardens, along with stones, ponds and other accents add value to your homes and instant curb appeal! If you're thinking of selling your Champaign/Urbana home, this is one of the areas to plan on spending a little money before putting your home on the market!

 

For more Home Selling Tips  visit my website at http://www.champaignrose.com or call my office to speak with me personally about your home!

Resource: Better Homes & Garden July 2016