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Speedy Spring Sales In Champaign IL

by Rose Price

Putting your home on the market can be stressful. Showing after showing after showing requires your home to be presentable at all times. You’re forced to vacate at a moments notice, not to mention the kids and the dog.  So, how can you make this process a little less stressful and guarantee you home sells?    

First of all, buyers are always more interested in a home the first few weeks it's on the market, the longer it sits, the lower your chances are of selling quickly and for top dollar.  So, you really need to be prepared and come out blazing.

There are three main ingredients in a quick home sale: 

1) It needs to show well 

2) It needs to be marketed well

3) It needs to be priced correctly. 

So, without further ado, here are some of the best tips and tricks to optimize these three ingredients and to ensure a speedy spring sale.  

Rent A Storage Unit

Most people think, “ok, declutter, let’s put everything in the closet.” This is  BAD idea, the closest are part of the home, so anyone viewing the home is certainly going to look at the storage spaces and an unorganized, overstuffed closet doesn’t show well.  Your closets should be as clutter free and beautiful as you’ve mede the rest of the house. Instead of shoving things in the basement and closets, consider renting a storage unit.  It is super convenient and will allow you to keep your home show ready much easier.  As a general rule, you probably don’t need or use a third of your stuff, and it’s actually probably closer to half. Things like holiday decorations, old baby stuff, seasonal clothes, your kids old art projects…put it all in storage. Better yet, you can choose a portable unit, which can be transported on moving day, making your move even more convenient.  

Staging/Photography

A professional home stager sees your home from a the most discerning buyer's perspective and a good stager knows exactly how to highlight your home’s best features and minimize it’s flaws.  The first impression a buyer gets is often from listing photos online, so naturally these photos should be the highest quality possible.  Also of note, is that studies show homes with more than six listing photos online are twice as likely to be viewed by buyers. 

However, not everyone wants their home staged, and we understand. So, what can you do instead?  Have a friend or two or three take turns walking from the curb through your house as if they were a buyer. Encourage them to look for areas to improve.  Then have your agent do the same thing.  Even the most beautiful homes can benefit from these practices.  

Find The Right Real Estate Agent

Don't hire a real estate agent just because your friend used them or because their son is in your kid’s English class. Hire an agent with a proven track record.  Someone who has proven their ability to sell homes fast.  You want someone who is familiar with the neighborhood.  You want someone who is not afraid to correct your errors.  Face it, they do this for a living and no matter how hard you try, you’re going to miss some things.  Your agent should be able to walk into your home and tell you exactly what buyers will love and hate, and then help you fix those hate points.  

Besides a great track record, look at their reviews.  What is it like to work with this person?  You should also make sure your agent is savvy online, since this is where most Real Estate business starts these days.  Look at the photos on their website (remember tip #2?), make sure they hire professional photographers to take photos of the home. Look at their social media.  Are they utilizing these outlets to sell homes? 

Do Some Work Yourself

If you’re really trying to sell your home, don't leave all the marketing to your agent. Get the word out yourself.  Facebook, Instagram, Twitter; if you have these use them.  Send e-mails, texts, let people know!  Don’t stop at your friends either.  Make it known in your neighborhood too! You never know who may know someone whose looking for a home in town. Let others help.

Depersonalize

This is Important, and can be hard for some people.  Most homes are covered with family photos and this can make it hard to imagine yourself living their.  At this point it still seems like someone else’s home, but your buyers need to imagine themselves living there. So, no matter how cute those baby pictures are, take them down when you put your home on the market.  Same goes for extravagant art.  You want your home to be interesting, but you don’t want the art distracting from the home itself.  People also have different tastes in art, so if they hate the art, they again, may find it hard to imagine living there.  

 

Upgrades

You don't need to go overboard on remodels to make your home more appealing. Honestly, chances are, you probably won’t get this money back in the sale.  So, instead, focus on the little things, especially the kitchen and bathroom.  New sinks and cabinets go a long way! Light fixtures, new shower curtains nice towels; these are all little things that can have a huge impact on potential buyers.  So, instead of spending $35,000 on a full kitchen remodel, get rid of your mismatched appliances and spend $3,500 on new stainless steel appliances. Small investments can make a huge impact, and you’ll have a better chance at optimizing your ROI.  

Lighten Up

Chances are pretty good you are not a vampire, its likely your buyers aren’t either, so brighten up your home.  Dark or poorly lit home can feel a little depressing.  A bright combination of natural and artificial light is the best way to go.  G the highest wattage lightbulb your fixture will allow, which even come in eco friendly styles now and it will instantly make your home brighter and more inviting.  Every time you leave for a showing, turn the lights on and open the blinds.  A fresh coat of paint will also go a long way.  A lighter natural color paint will help make your rooms look larger.  Last finishing touch, a good solid cleaning.  Make those baseboards sparkle!   

Curb Appeal

Curb Appeal is so hugely important, it can’t be overstated.  Your home’s exterior is the first thing potential buyers see.  If it doesn’t look great, a buyer won’t even consider it.   So, clean up the yard.  Consider trimming the hedges and the lawn, add fresh mulch, maybe get your lawn edged, a good pressure washing is always good, clean the driveways and walkways, maybe a fresh coat of paint to the trim and shutters as well. Everything matters, even the little things like polishing the brass on the front door.   Go a bit farther, add some Flowers near the entryway, a splash of color helps your home feel alive and inviting. 

Offer incentives

It may seem a little counterintuitive in a seller’s market, however the facts don’t lie. Last year, the best year for U.S. home sales in almost a decade, 37% of all sellers offered incentives to attract buyers.  With the added competition in the market, incentives could be the deciding factor for a buyer.  If you’re a seller and you’re able to offer a little money toward closing costs, you’re making it easier for that buyer, which may in turn make them more willing to give you the full asking price.  So in the end you could end up with a faster sale and a larger profit. 

Know The Facts

Spring and summer are the best times to sell your home.  If you can wait until then, you probably should.  However, selling during the peak season also means there is more competition and buyers can be pickier.  So, if you are selling in the Spring and Summer, these tips are especially important. Another important fact, is that homes that aren’t priced right just don’t sell, and the longer your home sits on the market, the less desirable it is.  Buyers often expect something to be wrong with these homes.  You absolutely have to price your home right, it’s that simple.  Do some research on local comps, get a few suggestions from other agents, and then ultimately listen to your agent, which should be the expert we discussed in the beginning of the article.  It can be hard hearing your home isn’t worth what you thought, but it’s not worth wasting the summer on.  Let your Agent take the lead on pricing and negotiating.

Looking for more information on how to Sell your home quickly this Spring, give the Rose Price Team a call 217.202.8843.  Not ready to chat yet? Then visit some of our FREE Seller's Resources.  We also have numerous FREE resources for Buyers.    

Check out Trulia, a Great Real Estate Resource.

Daylight Savings in Champaign IL

by Rose Price

Daylight Saving Time gives us the opportunity to get a little more out of sunny summer evenings.  Yet, the implementation of Daylight Saving Time has been pretty controversial ever since Benjamin Franklin conceived of the idea. Even today, there are regions and countries continually changing their approaches to Daylight Saving Time.

Most of the United States begins Daylight Saving Time at 2:00 a.m. on the second Sunday in March and reverts to standard time on the first Sunday in November. In the U.S., each time zone switches at a different time.

Clocks change at 2:00 a.m. local time. In spring, clocks spring forward from 1:59 a.m. to 3:00 a.m.; in fall, clocks fall back from 1:59 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. Daylight Saving Time commences at 2:00 a.m. to minimize disruption. However, many states restrict bars from serving alcohol between 2:00 a.m. and 6:00 a.m. But 2:00 a.m. in the fall presents a little trouble or opportunity depending who you ask.  The time switches back one hour. So, some bars serve alcohol for that additional hour. Though some states battle this, claiming that bars actually stop serving liquor at 1:59 a.m., so they have already stopped serving when the time reverts to Standard Time anyway. Other states solve the problem by saying that liquor can be served until "two hours after midnight." In practice, however, many establishments stay open an extra hour in the fall.

2:00 a.m. was originally chosen as the changeover time for practical reasons.  Most people were at home and this was the time, few trains were running, it is late enough to minimally affect bars and restaurants, and it prevents the day from switching to yesterday, which would be confusing, and it’s early enough that the entire continental U.S. switches by daybreak, changing over before most early shift workers are affected.

In the U.S., clocks change at 2:00 a.m. local time. In spring, clocks spring forward from 1:59 a.m. to 3:00 a.m.; in fall, clocks fall back from 1:59 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. 

The main purpose of Daylight Saving Time (called "Summer Time" in many places in the world) is to simply make better use of daylight. We change our clocks during the summer months to move an hour of daylight from the morning to the evening. 

INTERESTING DAYLIGHT SAVINGS CONTROVERSIES

Draft Status, Vietnam War

A man, born just after 12:00 a.m. DST, avoided the Vietnam War draft by using a daylight saving time loophole. When he was drafted, he argued that standard time, not DST, was the official time for recording births in his state of Delaware in the year of his birth. Thus, under official standard time he was actually born on the previous day--and that day had a much higher draft lottery number, which allowed him to avoid the war.

Daylight Saving Time Saved Lives

In September 1999, the West Bank was on Daylight Saving Time while Israel had just switched back to standard time. West Bank terrorists prepared time bombs and smuggled them to their Israeli counterparts, who misunderstood the time on the bombs. As the bombs were being planted, they exploded--one hour too early--killing three terrorists instead of the intended victims--two busloads of people.

Halloween Treats

Through 2006, Daylight Saving Time in the U.S. ended a few days before Halloween. Children’s pedestrian deaths are four times higher on Halloween than on any other night of the year. A new law to extend DST to the first Sunday in November took effect in 2007, with the purpose of providing trick-or-treaters more light and therefore more safety from traffic accidents. This was good news for candy manufacturers, who lobbied for a Daylight Saving Time extension Halloween for decades, as many of the young trick-or-treaters gathering candy are not allowed out after dark, and thus an added hour of light means a big holiday treat for the candy industry. 

Daylight Saving Time Chaos 

Widespread confusion was created during the 1950s and 1960s when each U.S. locality could start and end Daylight Saving Time as it desired. One year, 23 different pairs of DST start and end dates were used in Iowa alone. For exactly five weeks each year, Boston, New York, and Philadelphia were not on the same time as Washington D.C., Cleveland, or Baltimore--but Chicago was. And, on one Ohio to West Virginia bus route, passengers had to change their watches seven times in 35 miles! The situation led to millions of dollars in costs to several industries, especially those involving transportation and communications. Extra railroad timetables alone cost the today's equivalent of over $12 million per year.

Minneapolis-St. Paul

The Minnesota cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul once didn't have twin perspectives with regard to the clock. These two large cities are adjacent at some points and separated only by the Mississippi River at others, and are considered a single metropolitan area. In 1965, St. Paul decided to begin its Daylight Saving Time period early to conform to most of the nation, Minneapolis felt it should follow Minnesota's state law, which stipulated a later start date. After intense inter-city negotiations and quarreling, the cities still couldn’t agree, so the one-hour time difference remained, bringing great time turmoil to the cities and surrounding areas.

Daylight Saving Riots

Patrons of bars that stay open past 2:00 a.m. lose one hour of drinking time on the day when Daylight Saving Time springs forward one hour. This has led to problems in numerous locations, and sometimes even to riots. For example, at a "time disturbance" in Athens, Ohio, site of Ohio University, over 1,000 students and other late night partiers chanted "Freedom," as they threw liquor bottles at the police attempting to control the riot.

Amtrak

To keep to their published timetables, trains cannot leave a station before the scheduled time. So, when the clocks fall back one hour in October, all Amtrak trains in the U.S. that are running on time stop at 2:00 a.m. and wait one hour before resuming. Overnight passengers are often surprised to find their train at a dead stop and their travel time an hour longer than expected. At the spring Daylight Saving Time change, trains instantaneously become an hour behind schedule at 2:00 a.m., but they just keep going and do their best to make up the time.

Operas

Among the first institutions affected by Daylight Saving Time was the Berlin Opera, on April 30, 1916--the evening when the clocks in Germany were to be set forward for the first time. At 11:00 p.m., all German clocks were to be set to midnight. The Berlin Opera, with wonderful forethought, changed its schedule and began its performance of Die Meistersinger an hour earlier than usual. This allowed grateful audience members to be able to catch their customary trains home at the end of the performance. (All trains scheduled to depart between 11:00 p.m. and midnight were immediately behind schedule when 11:00 p.m. changed to midnight, and so left as soon as possible. And trains scheduled to depart after midnight left the equivalent of one hour early.

Violent Crime

A study by the U.S. Law Enforcement Assistance Administration found that crime was consistently less during periods of Daylight Saving Time than during comparable standard time periods. Data showed violent crime down 10 to 13 percent. It is clear that for most crimes where darkness is a factor, such as muggings, there are many more incidents after dusk than before dawn, so light in the evening is most welcome.

Antarctica

In Antarctica, there is no daylight in the winter and months of 24-hour daylight in the summer. But many of the research stations there still observe Daylight Saving Time anyway, to synchronize with their supply stations in Chile or New Zealand.

Manslaughter

In California, a Chevrolet Blazer packed with teenagers struck the median of a street and flipped over, tragically killing one teen and injuring several others. The teen driver, fighting charges of felony vehicular manslaughter, claimed that the street was dangerously wet and unsafe due a lawn sprinkler system. The landscaper responsible for the computerized sprinklers testified that the sprinklers were set to come on more than fifteen minutes after the fatal accident. The outcome hinged on whether the sprinklers' timer had been adjusted for a recent Daylight Saving Time change, for without the DST adjustment, the sprinklers had around 45 minutes to make the road slick.

Indiana

Indiana has long been a hotbed of Daylight Saving Time controversy. Historically, the state's two western corners, which fall in the Central Time Zone, observed DST, while the remainder of the state, in the Eastern Time zone, followed year-round Standard Time. An additional complication was that five southeastern counties near Cincinnati and Louisville unofficially observed DST to keep in sync with those cities. Because of the longstanding feuds over DST, Indiana politicians often treated the subject gingerly. In 1996, gubernatorial candidate Rex Early firmly declared, "Some of my friends are for putting all of Indiana on Daylight Saving Time. Some are against it. And I always try to support my friends."

In April 2005, Indiana legislators passed a law that implemented Daylight Saving Time statewide. 

Oil Conservation

Following the 1973 oil embargo, the U.S. Congress extended Daylight Saving Time to 8 months, rather than the normal six months. During that time, the U.S. Department of Transportation found that observing Daylight Saving Time in March and April saved the equivalent in energy of 10,000 barrels of oil each day - a total of 600,000 barrels in each of those two years.

In 1986, Daylight Saving Time moved from the last Sunday in April to the first Sunday in April. No change was made to the ending date of the last Sunday in October. Adding the entire month of April to Daylight Saving Time is estimated to save the U.S. about 300,000 barrels of oil each year.

Beginning in 2007, Daylight Saving Time commenced on the second Sunday in March and ended on the first Sunday in November, thereby saving even more oil.

Births and Birthdays

Twins born at 11:55 p.m. and 12:05 a.m. may have different birthdays, and more impressive, Daylight Saving Time can change birth order -- on paper, anyway. During the time change in the fall, one baby could be born at 1:55 a.m. and the sibling born ten minutes later, at 1:05 a.m. In the spring, there is a gap when no babies are born at all: from 2:00 a.m. to 3:00 a.m.

In November 2007, Laura Cirioli of North Carolina gave birth to Peter at 1:32 a.m. and, 34 minutes later, to Allison. However, because Daylight Saving Time reverted to Standard Time at 2:00 a.m., Allison was born at 1:06 a.m.

Amish Observance

Amish communities in the United States and Canada are divided about whether or not to observe Daylight Saving Time. Although the Amish are generally known for leading simple lives without modern conveniences, practices vary from community to community. Likewise, some Amish communities observe DST, while others do not. In one county in Ohio, approximately 10 of the 90 Amish church districts opt out of DST (known as “fast time” or “English time,” preferring to observe what they term “slow time.”

Stealing Time

As with the U.S., Great Britain has had a colorful past with Daylight Saving Time (or Summer Time, as it is known there). In the early part of the 20th century, citizens protested at the change, using the slogan, “Give us back our stolen hour.”

Arizona Is Divided

In the U.S., Arizona doesn’t observe Daylight Saving Time, but the Navajo Nation (parts of which are in three states) does. However, the Hopi Reservation, which is entirely surrounded by the Navajo Nation, doesn’t observe DST. In effect, there is a donut-shaped area of Arizona that does observe DST, but the “hole” in the center does not.

Thanks to IDEA for sharing some interesting Daylight Saving Facts.

Exciting Events Coming Up In Champaign IL

by Rose Price

Tuesday, March 8

Pogo Studio: Capturing the Sounds of the Champaign-Urbana Music Scene 1985-2014

Sousa Archives & Center for American Music

1103 S. Sixth St. 236 Harding Band Building, Champaign 

The Sousa Archives and Center of Music is known for exceptional exhibits and the preservations of American Music.  This is only one of several special events.  Also of note is the Transient Journeys: The Life and Music of Harry Partch Exhibit that is approaching it's end.  It will be on display until April 29th.  If you haven't seen it yet, get yourself to the center, you won't be disappointed.  Visit their Exhibits Page for information on more upcoming events and exhibits. 

Thursday, March 10

Local Women as Change Agents: Traditions of Philanthropy and Political Action

Student Life and Culture Archives

1707 South Orchard St. Urbana, IL 61801

7:00pm to 8:30pm

Sponsored by the Student Life and Culture Archives of the University of Illinois and the Champaign Country Historical Archives, the Town & Gown Speaker Series highlights local stories through exhibits and events. Join them throughout the year for exciting speakers and stories about Champaign.

Full Schedule

Sunday, March 13

The Illinois Park & Recreation Association’s Teen Committee offers a lot of incredibly opportunities but on March 13 there is a unique opportunity for teen bands throughout Illinois, to play for a crowd and duke it out to see who is truly the best band in Illinois. The event features the talents of young musicians, giving them a chance to play in-front of a new audience, meet other bands and gain great experience on stage. Judges will give feedback at each level of the competition and the top bands win additional chances to play as well as other prizes. The winners move on to regional competitions, and finally advance to the state finals, which takes place each August at the Illinois State Fair.

A great chance to perform at the Fluid Events Center, competing for prizes, local performance opportunities, and a studio recording session. All musical styles are welcome and al

l band members must be between the ages of 12-21 with at least half of the members 19 or under on the date of the
state finals.

PRIZES! 

  • Win a chance for gigs at the Blues Brews and BBQ event for both Friday and Saturday, and at the Taste of Champaign!
  • We also have a two hour recording session from Perennial Sound Studio, owned and operated by Ryan Groff of the band Elsinore
  • Gift cards and other items from local music shops!​​​​​

Thursday, April 7-10 

BONEYARD ARTS FESTIVAL

The Boneyard Arts Festival is presented annually every spring by 40 North | 88 West.  It's a 4-day event showcasing a broad range of the creative activity flourishing in our community.  It's more than your average arts walk, the Boneyard is a unique countywide celebration that takes place in over 90 Venues -- and features the work of hundreds of artists. Sculptors, weavers, painters, photographers and other visual artists come together with musicians, actors, dancers, poets and performers of all kinds for one reason; To share their creativity and celebrate their craft.   The event takes place throughout Champaign, Urbana, U of I Campus, Rantoul, Homer, Mahomet, St. Joseph and Sidney.

 

Why A Leap Year?

by Rose Price


So, you’re most likely working an extra day this year and not getting paid for it!  It’s a leap year.  The strange worldwide calendrical event, where old folks finally celebrate their sweet sixteen, women propose to men and depending where you live, it can bring good or bad luck.  February will have 29 days this Month, but why? Why do we do it?  Why all this confusion of an extra day?  

 It’s all about Astrology:  

 One solar year is 365 and a quarter day long (around 365.242 days). It takes roughly 365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes, and 45 seconds for the Earth to Orbit the sun. It’s that extra five-or-so hours that are to blame for Leap days. Every four years, an extra day is added to the calendar to compensate for those missing quarters of a day. Since a solar year is 0.242 days longer than the calendar year, and not exactly 0.25, the Julian calendar drifted off by one day every 128 years. The Gregorian calendar fixed this problem by establishing a model which considered every fourth year a leap year. Also, according to Gregorian calculations any year which is divisible by 100 and not by 400 will not be considered a leap year (eg. the year 1900). Experts, however, say there are still tiny discrepancies with this method and our Gregorian system will have to be revisited...in about 10,000 years.  Now that we got the Science stuff out of the way, there are actually a lot of really fascinating facts surrounding leap days/years.  

First let’s look at some folks who took complete advantage of this extra day:

The Month of February originally had 30 days, during the reign of Julius Caesar, but when Caesar Augustus came to power, he wanted August (the month named after him) which had 29 days then, to have 31 days, just like the month of July (named after his predecessor Julius). So, he stole a couple days from February to make the number of days in August similar to that of July. Since then, February has had 28 days with Feb. 29 as the leap day. 

During his final trip to the West Indies, explorer Christopher Columbus used a lunar eclipse on Feb. 29, 1504 to his advantage. After being stranded in Jamaica for months and the indigenous people refusing any more help to him and his crew.  Knowing that a lunar eclipse was due, Columbus gathered the native chiefs on Feb. 29 and told them God will punish them by painting the Moon red and the only way God would withdraw the punishment is if they would co-operate again. Soon, the panicked chiefs agreed and heaved a sigh of relief when the Moon emerged from its shadow. Pretty sly there Chris!

Now, one of the more fun traditions is the tradition of women proposing to men.  This happens on a leap day.  There are many historical explanations; one goes all the way back to the 5th Century, when St. Bridget complained to St. Patrick that women and to wait too long for their men to propose, so St. Patrick announced that a single day in a leap year, the last day of the shortest month would be the day women can propose to men!

In Denmark, the day when a woman can propose to her man is Feb. 24, a tradition that goes back to the time of Caesar. However, if a man refuses a woman’s proposal on that day, Danish men have to give 12 pairs of gloves to the lady and in Finland, if men refuse, they have to give fabric for a skirt.

In a few European countries such as Greece, leap years are considered bad luck and people are advised to avoid certain ceremonies and activities like weddings or buying a house. In Russia, leap years are believed to bring abrupt weather patterns and increased risk of deaths.

The town of Anthony in Texas, USA is known as the ‘Leap Year Capital of the World’ and holds a festival that includes a guided trip to an Aztec Cave, a party at the horse farm and square dancing. In 2016, the festival will run from Feb. 25-29.

Famous records associated with leap days:

St. Petersburg, Florida, became a city on a leap day in 1892 

 Hattie McDaniel became the first African-American to win an Academy Award for her performance in “Gone with the Wind” on a leap day in 1940.

Other Fun Leap Year Facts:

The first ever Playboy Club was opened by Hugh Hefner in Chicago, Illinois on Feb. 29, 1960, a leap day.

 A baby born on a leap day is called a ‘leapling,’ or a ‘leaper.’ The probability of being born on a leap day is one in 1,461, as four years have 1,460 days with one extra day added in the leap year, bringing the total to 1,461. 

According to leap year folklore, beans and peas planted in this year 'grow the wrong way.

 Sir James Wilson (1812-1880), Premier of Tasmania is the only notable person known to have been born and died on Feb. 29.

 The civil code in China, since Oct. 10, 1929, suggests that the legal birthday of a leapling is on Feb. 28. In Hong Kong, March 1 is considered the legal birthday of someone born on a leap day.

 Feb. 29 is also marked as Rare Disease Day. 

In Champaign, we believe it's GREAT LUCK to Buy a Home during Leap Year...especially when Mortgage Rates are at Historic Lows! If you'd like to learn more about the Housing Market here in Champaign, give us a call at 217.202.8843 or visit our website

Winter Home Tips For Your Champaign Home: Ice Dam Prevention

by Rose Price

 

Icicles hanging off your house look beautiful, but they're usually a sign of trouble. 

The same conditions that allow icicles to form; snow-covered roofs and freezing weather, also lead to ice dams (thick ridges of solid ice that build up along the eaves). 

These dams can tear off gutters, loosen shingles, and cause water to back up and pour into your house. Obviously when this happens, the results aren’t pretty.  Paint peels, floors warp, ceilings get stained and worse sag, and the insulation in your attic becomes soggy, which is magnet for harmful mold.  

How it happens:

First, heat collects in the attic and warms the roof...but doesn't warm the eaves.

The snow on the warm roof melts, causing the water to rush down to the eaves…which are still cold.  So, the water freezes again. 

This ice accumulates along the eaves, forming a dam, preventing the water from running into the gutters and away from the house. So the Melt water from the warm roof backs up behind this ice, forcing it to flow beneath the shingles, and finally into the house.

Find out how to get rid of them OR better yet, prevent them below:  

 

Quick Fixes: 

Hacking away at ice dams with a hammer, chisel, or shovel is bad for your roofing—obviously…and is also quite dangerous for you. Throwing salt on them will do a lot more damage than the ice.  So, what do you do?

 Freeze It

Bring a box fan into the attic and aim it at the underside of the roof where water is actively leaking in. This targeted dose of cold air should freeze the water in its tracks.  This method can stop water from flowing in in just a few minuets.  

Rake It

Pounding is bad.  Raking, you can get away with.  Simply use a long handled aluminum roof rake to rake the snow and ice.  You want to make sure it is a dedicated roof rake, so you don’t damage your shingles. 

Steal Your Wife’s Pantyhose

Ok, so maybe you should ask first.  But you can lessen the damage after a dam has formed with a simple trick.  Fill the leg of an old pair of pantyhose with Calcium Chloride Ice Melter.  Then simply lay the hose onto the roof so it crosses the ice dam and hangs over the gutter.  The calcium chloride will melt through the snow and ice and create a channel for water to flow down into the gutters or off the roof, thus eliminating the backed up water.  

 

Permanent Fixes 

Preventing ice dams for good is simple: Just keep the roof the same temperature as the eaves. Do that by increasing ventilation, adding insulation, and sealing off every possible air leak that might warm the underside of the roof.

Taking care of these trouble spots (listed in order of priority) will give you a dam-free winter and will also lower your energy bill!

How to prevent it?

Two words: Heated Cables.  Attach with clips along the roof's edge in a zigzag pattern. Heated cables combat ice dams that lift shingles and cause leaks. This method allows you to equalize your roof's temperature by heating it from the outside.  Keeping your roof one consistent temperature will prevent ice dams from flowing beneath your shingles.  You’ll want to be sure to install the cables well before bad weather hits.

 More Prevention Tips:

1. Ventilate Eaves And Ridge. A ridge vent paired with continuous soffit vents will circulate cold air under the entire roof. Both ridge and soffit vents should have the same size openings and provide at least 1 square foot of opening for every 300 square feet of attic floor. Place baffles at the eaves to maintain a clear path for the airflow from the soffit vents.

 

2. Seal Your Attic. Attics are full of air leaks.  Fill these! This will help keep everything the same temperature in your attic, which will in turn help to keep the roof one consistent temperature. You may want to add some more insulation as well.  Follow the video below for instructions on how to seal attic air leaks.  

 

3. Always Exhaust to the Outside. Make sure that the ducts connected to the kitchen, bathroom, and dryer vents all lead outdoors through either the roof or walls, but never through the soffit.

 

5. Install Sealed Can Lights. Old-style recessed lights give off great plumes of heat and cannot be insulated without creating a fire hazard. Replace these with sealed "IC" fixtures, which can be covered with insulation. Keeping the heat from escaping into your attic.

 

6. Flash Around Chimneys. Bridge the gap between your chimney and house framing with L-shaped steel flashing.  * NOTE * Using canned spray foam or insulation isn't fire safe.

 

7. Seal and Insulate Ducts. Spread fiber-reinforced mastic on the joints of HVAC ducts and exhaust ducts. Cover them entirely with R-5 or R-6 foil-faced fiberglass.

 

8. Caulk Cracks, Gaps and Air Leaks. Seal around electrical cables and vent pipes with a fire-stop sealant. Also, look for any spots where light shines up from below or the insulation is stained black by the dirt from passing air.

Looking to sell your home this winter?  Want more tips like these to keep your home in tip-top shape this selling season?  Contact the Rose Price Team for more Champaign Home Tips.  
 

5 Tips For Making Your Home More Appealing to Both Men & Women!

by Rose Price

Neutralize Your Home!

Neutralizing your home makes it appealing to both Genders.  

Here are 5 Tips on how to do it best

Whether you’re getting ready to put your home on the market or you’re simply updating your decor, there are a few important tips that will help you transform your home, while still appealing to both Gender’s personal tastes.

1. Pick a neutral base.
A good rule to follow is to start with a good base; pick neutral colors like grey, beige, and white for walls, floors, counters and your large furnishing. Then create depth with deeper tones; choose navy, black or burgundy and then add a splash of color with your accent pieces. Accent pieces can be artwork, rugs, pillows or curtains. This method is tried and true and will never go out of style.

2. Utilize tailored furniture with contemporary accents

Big tufted velvet or floral patterned sofas obviously speak more to feminine tastes with a more formal style. Using a streamlined sofa (pictured above) in a great neutral fabric with a sleek, contemporary coffee table, while adding in modern accents makes for a relaxed, welcoming atmosphere.  This is pleasing to both sexes.  You can still add your "pop of color" by pairing it with a colored leather chair- which is regarded as more "manly" but the colored part lends itself to the females a well, and the whole set-up gives you some sophistication too.

3. Bring on the patterns & texture! 

Just because you're looking to neutralize a room to make it more amenable to make sexes doesn't mean you need to give up texture & patterns....it just means you stay away from sequins & fluff.  Grab a great neutral patterned rug with a cozy woven throw blanket to hang over your sofa or chair and find some mis-matched, patterned & textured pillows. Believe me, both men & women LOVE cozy blankets & great pillows.  They look chic and are comfortable too!A patterned rug along with fun accents like a cozy woven throw blanket and textured pillows is a great way to add chic appeal.

*Don't go for delicate trinkets on coffee tables or shelves! Instead opt for the cool industrial or vintage style with chrome, metal, brass side tables, floor lamps and finishing touches that are super modern.

4. Mix and match fabrics

So many times, even in regular decors, people are afraid to mix & match fabrics. Don't be! Leather or velvet fabric furniture can be neutralized by adding accent pillows in linen, cotton, or canvas.  You can simply drape a cashmere throw blanket over the back of the leather couch and it becomes more welcoming and cozy. Even a fur blanket can be draped over the brushed leather and look ultra modern and appeal to both sexes, just don't overdo it with other more feminine accents. Keep things very balanced.  You also need to keep window treatments simple! Think soft, easy flowing fabrics or a simple, tailored roman shade style in a cream, gray or white.

5. Bring natural elements inside the home.

Nothing adds more of a manly touch to a home than adding a touch of nature with earthy elements like reclaimed wood tables, tree stump stools, woven baskets, natural fiber rugs, and even twisted tree branch arrangements.  You can bring flowers indoors, but you'll need to look at succulents or berry bearing type branches & greenery. Artwork should also be kept to coastal, nautical or landscape type scenery. Remember your theme throughout the home should stay neutral in order to stay pleasing to both genders. 

For more Home Selling and Staging Tips visit my Blog, Facebook Page and my Pinterest Boards

Have a POWERFUL day!  

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