Take of your jackets, you won’t need them.  The most famous Weatherman of all, Punxsutawney Phil has confirmed an early spring for all, and just to verify, a Groundhog in Canada has reported the same, and if you’re still not convinced, it seems Groundhogs everywhere concur with Phil, including General Beau Lee in Georgia and Staten Island Chuck in New York.  Notice the repetition here (which is actually the collective noun for groundhogs)?  Ahh, I get it now Harold.

 So, who do we listen to?  Not everyone agrees with Phil.  For the Northeast and mid-Atlantic, AccuWeathermeteorologists are concerned for just the opposite, predicting cold air and possibly snow, that could linger into March.  However, a quick warm up is predicted, allowing milder air to arrive faster than it has in the past two years for both regions.

Big cities around the Great Lakes will have nice weather for an early planting season in May, with milder temperatures and frequent sunshine expected.  

Spring will kick off with periods of wet weather across the Southeast, increasing the risk for flooding throughout the region. Florida, Georgia and South Carolina will be at an especially high risk. From late February through March, the threat for severe thunderstorms will ramp up in Florida. Elsewhere however, severe weather will get a slow start with below-normal tornado totals predicted for the month.

Come April, warmer air will help to fuel severe storms, allowing multiple, widespread outbreaks to occur. Atlanta, Charlotte, North Carolina, and Chattanooga and Nashville, Tennessee, are all in the line of fire. In the Gulf Coast states, the severe weather may turn into flooding events during April and May. Those concerned for early tropical development can breathe a sigh of relief: The chance for an early impact will be low. 

There you have it, the weather forecast from two very different kind of Weathermen.  

Now For the most Famous Groundhog's Day of all:

The bizarre tradition of Groundhog Day originated from an ancient celebration of the midway point between the winter solstice and the spring equinox (the day right in the middle of astronomical winter.) According to the ancient superstition, sunny skies mean a stormy and cold second half of winter while cloudy skies indicate an early arrival of warm weather.  This evolved in Germany where a Badger or a Sacred Bear was the predictor and evolved again with German Immigrants in the 18th and 19th Century.  It is similar to the Celtic Holiday Imbolc, which is celebrated on Feb. 2nd and also includes weather predictions.