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Coming Up and Around Downtown

by Rose Price

 

 

 

This year's Artists Against AIDS show will be held April 4-7 at the McKinley Aquatic Center, 500 W. Church Street. Artists Against AIDS began in 1993 as a benefit for what was then known as the Gay Community AIDS Project. The proceeds from this exhibition and sale are a crucial part of The Greater Community AIDS Project of East Central Ilinois’s budget, enabling the organization to assist hundreds of clients through difficult times when many have nowhere else to turn. Artists Against AIDS continues to be a valuable resource to GCAP, the local art community, and the “Greater Community” as well.

 

Banner2013

The 5th Annual Christie Clinic Marathon will run right through downtown Champaign on Saturday, April 27. Line the streets by 7a to cheer on the first marathoners--it's quite a sight. Then catch breakfast at Merry Ann's Diner.

 

 

crane march 2013

THE VIEW FROM MY WINDOW on a sunny, yet COLD, March day. Enough about the weather...we are excited about the Hyatt Place hotel progress. The crane is really fun to watch and the construction noise is music to our ears. What do you guys think?

 

ebertfest

Don't forget about Ebertfest going on at the Virginia Theater, April 17-20.

If you have friends or colleagues coming into town, invite them to stay in one of M2's executive furnished condos and they can enjoy the heart of Downtown Champaign. Contact Suzanne for availability and prices.

 

 

 

How to Prevent Neighbors from Devaluing Your Home!

by Rose Price

 

Your troublesome neighbor may not just be a nuisance...but a drain on your property's value. According to the Appraisal Institute, a professional association of real estate appraisers, homeowners and potential homebuyers should be aware that problematic neighbors can significantly reduce nearby property values.

Less-than-stellar neighbors can include homeowners with annoying pets, unkempt yards, unpleasant odors, loud music, dangerous trees and limbs, or poorly maintained exteriors. A homeowner or prospective homebuyer should visit a street on several days at various times to learn more about what is happening in the neighborhood. A home’s proximity to a bad neighbor also can impact the rate of potential decline in value.

According to Appraisal Institute President Richard L. Borges II, MAI, SRA, external situations, such as living near a bad neighbor, can lower home values by more than 5 to 10 percent. Appraisers refer to this as external obsolescence, which is depreciation caused by external factors not on the property.

The Appraisal Institute suggests taking the following steps to help solve neighbor issues:

1. Speak with other neighbors.
Get consensus when identifying issues, and approach the problematic neighbor together.

2. Look up original and updated subdivision restrictions. If talking to the neighbor doesn’t work, see if they’re violating any restrictions. If so, writing to the code office of the municipality and reporting the problem could spur an investigation into the nuisance. Depending on the offense, a call to the local health department also may be warranted.

3. Hire an attorney. If all else fails, the cost of an attorney likely will be less than the home’s potential loss in value.

When looking to buy or sell a home, also consult a real estate professional who is deeply entrenched in your neighborhood. An experienced agent will be able to identify potential neighbor problems and can help you troubleshoot the issue.

As a Member of the Top 5 in Real Estate Network®, I have a wealth of real estate and homeownership information that may be of help to you. Feel free to contact me any time to learn more about this important information, and be sure to forward this article on to any friends or family that may be interested as well.

Sincerely,

Rose Price
roseprice@champaignrose.com
Prudential Landmark
Office: 217-352-1933
Mobile: 217-202-8843
http://www.ChampaignRose.com

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HOUSING STRATEGIES FOR SENIORS

by Rose Price

 

People are living longer today. The century-long expansion in the world’s population that is 65 and older is the product of dramatic advances in medical science and healthy lifestyles. Currently, 13 percent of the U.S. population is 65 and older, up from 4 percent in 1900. As baby boomers turn 65 in higher and higher annual numbers, it is estimated that one in five Americans will be over age 65 and about 5 percent over 85. All this calls for growing care and services for the elderly population and pre-planning for lifestyles in the future.

The senior housing industry has been growing dramatically over the last 15 years as adult children look for smart solutions to their parents’ needs, whether physical or social. Alternatives for Seniors offers a number of things to consider when choosing lifestyle options for the older generation:

  • Location. Keeping your parents close to home should not be the number one consideration. Although it is important that the community be convenient for family and friends to visit, being close to amenities they need and trust will make their senior living experience rewarding and more fulfilling.
  • Type of community. Visiting to make sure the current residents have similar interests, backgrounds and values will allow for a more enriching life in the golden years. Many communities invite prospective residents to tour their community and enjoy lunch with the community, which is a wonderful way to ascertain if the culture is a fit. Many communities offer a weekend stay to experience more fully what the community has to offer.
  •   
  • Staff. Is the staff appropriately dressed, personable and outgoing? Do the staff members treat each other in a professional manner? Does the staff call residents by name and interact warmly? The answers to these questions will determine quite a bit toward whether the community is right for your loved one.
  • Medical needs. Does the community have on-site medical supervision? If not, is there an agency that is associated with the community that can help when needed?

Finding and choosing a housing option for an aging loved one can be a difficult process. Be sure to keep seniors' needs as your top priority in order to find a community that properly suits them.

As a Member of the Top 5 in Real Estate Network®, I have a wealth of real estate and homeownership information that may be of help to you. Feel free to contact me any time to learn more about this important information, and be sure to forward this article on to any friends or family that may be interested as well.

Sincerely,

Rose Price
roseprice@champaignrose.com
Prudential Landmark
Office: 217-352-1933 
Mobile: 217-202-8843
http://www.ChampaignRose.com

This email was sent by RISMedia, Inc. on behalf of Rose Price.

 

 

  

 People are living longer today. The century-long expansion in the world’s population that is 65 and older is the product of dramatic advances in medical science and healthy lifestyles. Currently, 13 percent of the U.S. population is 65 and older, up from 4 percent in 1900. As baby boomers turn 65 in higher and higher annual numbers, it is estimated that one in five Americans will be over age 65 and about 5 percent over 85. All this calls for growing care and services for the elderly population and pre-planning for lifestyles in the future.

The senior housing industry has been growing dramatically over the last 15 years as adult children look for smart solutions to their parents’ needs, whether physical or social. Alternatives for Seniors offers a number of things to consider when choosing lifestyle options for the older generation:
•Location. Keeping your parents close to home should not be the number one consideration. Although it is important that the community be convenient for family and friends to visit, being close to amenities they need and trust will make their senior living experience rewarding and more fulfilling.
•Type of community. Visiting to make sure the current residents have similar interests, backgrounds and values will allow for a more enriching life in the golden years. Many communities invite prospective residents to tour their community and enjoy lunch with the community, which is a wonderful way to ascertain if the culture is a fit. Many communities offer a weekend stay to experience more fully what the community has to offer.
•Staff. Is the staff appropriately dressed, personable and outgoing? Do the staff members treat each other in a professional manner? Does the staff call residents by name and interact warmly? The answers to these questions will determine quite a bit toward whether the community is right for your loved one.
•Medical needs. Does the community have on-site medical supervision? If not, is there an agency that is associated with the community that can help when needed?

Finding and choosing a housing option for an aging loved one can be a difficult process. Be sure to keep seniors' needs as your top priority in order to find a community that properly suits them.

As a Member of the Top 5 in Real Estate Network®, I have a wealth of real estate and homeownership information that may be of help to you. Feel free to contact me any time to learn more about this important information, and be sure to forward this article on to any friends or family that may be interested as well.

Sincerely,


Rose Price
roseprice@champaignrose.com
Prudential Landmark
Office: 217-352-1933
Mobile: 217-202-8843
http://www.ChampaignRose.com

This email was sent by RISMedia, Inc. on behalf of Rose Price.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Five Things to Boost your Creditworthiness in 2013

by Rose Price

 

Whether it’s a New Year’s resolution or part of the holiday hangover, for many people, January involves a financial overhaul. Here are five fairly simple ways to impact your creditworthiness over the rest of the year that may, over time, also boost your credit score….

improve creditWhether it’s a New Year’s resolution or part of the holiday hangover, for many people, January involves a financial overhaul. Here are five fairly simple ways to impact your creditworthiness over the rest of the year that may, over time, also boost your credit score.

1. Pay your bills on time. Because payment history makes up about 35 percent of your credit history, paying your bills on time is very important. One delinquent payment that is just 30 days late will stay on your credit report for up to seven years. Remember that paying your bill in full and on time is positive for your credit history and score.

2. Check your credit report regularly. Sometimes people who know they have had some problems in the past—maxed out a credit card, missed a payment or two, or failed to pay a bill that ultimately went to collections—are afraid to check their credit report until it becomes absolutely necessary. However, it’s important to check your credit report regularly, regardless of whether you think you have a score of 550 or 750, so you can see where you stand—what debts need to be paid down, if you have any collections that need to be paid off immediately, or if there is any inaccurate information on the report. You also want to make sure you haven’t been the victim of identity theft, which can destroy your credit.

3. Pay off debt. The debt-to-available-credit ratio is another important aspect of your credit history; it’s more positive to have a higher ratio of available credit to debt. For example, if you have a credit card with a $10,000 limit, and you’ve charged $8,000, potential creditors might be worried about how much additional debt you can take on and about your ability to pay that debt off on time. If you only have a few hundred dollars of debt, you’ll be seen as more likely to be someone who pays debts off quickly and handles credit responsibly.

4. Fix any errors. If you discover an error, whether an erroneous address or a bill marked unpaid that you’re sure you did pay, fix it immediately. A creditor may have missed reporting a payment or you may never have received an important bill that was eventually sent to a collections agency. Start by disputing the error with the credit reporting agency—it will work to resolve the error with you and the creditor. You can also contact the creditor to see if you can resolve the error with that company. Remember to get names and take detailed notes during these conversations so you can reference them later.

5. Consider new credit opportunities. Some people have lower credit scores because they have a very thin file, meaning they don’t have much credit or have a very short credit history. Building your credit history takes time, but you can build a more positive credit report if you open more lines of credit. While it is certainly not recommended to take on debt you don’t need, you may want to try opening a retail, gas, or low-interest credit card. Keep in mind that this credit card isn’t for buying things you can’t afford; it’s about building a positive credit history. Charge only small amounts that you can easily pay off at the end of the month.                                                                                                                                                                                          Written by Diane Moogalian   

 

EXISTING-HOME SALES SEE STEADY PRICE GAINS

by Rose Price

If you’re considering buying or selling a home, you should be aware of the latest housing market statistics as they could affect when and how you make your decision. The good news is, things are increasingly looking up for real estate, freeing up buyers and sellers to finally move forward with confidence.

According to research from the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR), sales of existing homes edged up in January; at the same time, NAR reports a seller’s market developing thanks to home prices continuing to rise steadily above year-ago levels. In fact, sales rose in every region of the country but the West, which is the region most constrained by limited inventory.

Total existing-home sales - which are completed transactions that include single-family homes, townhomes, condominiums and co-ops - increased 0.4 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.92 million in January from a downwardly revised 4.90 million in December, and are 9.1 percent above the 4.51 million-unit pace in January 2012.

Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, said tight inventory is a major factor in the market.

“Buyer traffic is continuing to pick up, while seller traffic is holding steady,” says Yun. “In fact, buyer traffic is 40 percent above a year ago, so there is plenty of demand but insufficient inventory to improve sales more strongly. We’ve transitioned into a seller’s market in much of the country.”

Total housing inventory at the end of January fell 4.9 percent to 1.74 million existing homes available for sale, which represents a 4.2-month supply at the current sales pace, down from 4.5 months in December, and is the lowest housing supply since April 2005 when it was also 4.2 months.

Meanwhile, the national median existing-home price for all housing types was $173,600 in January, up 12.3 percent from January 2012, which is the 11th consecutive month of year-over-year price increases; that last occurred from July 2005 to May 2006. The January gain is the strongest since November 2005 when it was 12.9 percent above a year earlier.

NAR President Gary Thomas says homes are selling faster. “The typical home is selling nearly four weeks faster than it did a year ago,” he reports.

The median time on market for all homes was 71 days in January, down from 73 days in December and is 28.3 percent below 99 days in January 2012.

While these national statistics certainly tell an important story, real estate truly is local, as the saying goes, so be sure to find out the specific market data related to the neighborhoods in which you are buying or selling a home. An experienced real estate professional will be able to localize important data.

As a Member of the Top 5 in Real Estate Network®, I have a wealth of real estate and homeownership information that may be of help to you. Feel free to contact me any time to learn more about this important information, and be sure to forward this article on to any friends or family that may be interested as well.

Copyright© 2013 RISMedia, The Leader in Real Estate Information Systems and Real Estate News. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be republished without permission.

Sincerely,

Rose Price
roseprice@champaignrose.com
Prudential Landmark
Office:
217-352-1933
Mobile: 217-202-8843
http://www.ChampaignRose.com

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Rose Price
Landmark Real Estate
One East Main Street, Suite 200
Champaign IL 61820
217-202-8843
217-352-1933
Fax: 217-378-1281