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Create A Cozy Outdoor Living Space This Fall!

by Rose Price

Champaign-Urbana is truly spectacular in the FALL! As the days get cooler, the landscape is filled with stunning shades of orange, red, and yellow. Take advantage of the beauty of the season and remaining warmer days of the year by sprucing up your outdoor space. Create an autumnal oasis for you and your family to enjoy by following these top suggestions for transitioning your home’s exterior for fall.

 

  1. Add natural, seasonal color to the space with groupings of your favorite fall plants. The perfect flowers to use are chrysanthemums, mums, and sunflowers. Arrange these flowers into a collage of floral pots. You can also add wood or seasonal (pumpkins of course!) elements for added interest.

  2. Hang lighting that creates new areas for you to entertain and gather. Light strands, pendant lights, and lanterns can all instantly make the space seem brand new and create incredible atmosphere.

  3. Focus on natural and metallic elements that fit within the fall season but can also easily transition throughout the year.

  4. Update with simple accents, such as throw pillows, blankets, and outdoor area rug. Buy these and other accessories in autumnal colors.

  5. Create the perfect cozy spot for you to stay warm by adding a modern outdoor fireplace.

 

 

For additional homeowner tips, visit my website http://www.champaignrose.com/.

 

Wishing everyone a colorful and happy Fall in Champaign-Urbana!

 

 

Resource: HouseBeautiful

 

Ways to Take Care of Your Champaign Home this Winter

by Rose Price

Although winter is slowly winding down, there is still a chance for more snowfall in the Champaign-Urbana area before the season is through. It is important to protect your home during these cold winter months to make sure that you do not have any lasting problems into the future. Before and after the next snowfall, examine these areas where damage can occur and take measures to prevent and correct any potential issues. Doing so will keep your Champaign-Urbana home looking and working its very best!

 

Driveway and sidewalks. Ice and snow on concrete can lead to cracks. On top of that, it makes for hazardous walking conditions for your family and your guests. Be sure to remove all ice and snow immediately. Use eco-friendly gravel or salt to melt ice and remove those slippery areas.

Dead, large branches. Large branches that hang over your home, garage, or yard can cause serious damage. When the branch is dead, it can easily break away under heavy snow. On nicer days, go outside and cut away these branches to avoid any potential problems.

 

Roof. Large accumulations of snow on your roof can lead to cracking. This can turn into water leaking into your home and causing damage. After the snowfall, make sure to remove any areas with heavy accumulation. Also, check inside your home for water spots or bends that could indicate that the roof has already been damaged this season. If you find any problems, hire a professional to fix it as soon as possible.

 

Foundation. Moisture can enter into your foundation if there is too much ice and snow up against your home. After the snowfall, be sure to shovel around the base of your home. Also, check inside your home to make sure that there aren’t any new cracks.


Pipes. Pipes will burst if they become too cold. This can lead to a huge expense if they do due to flooding. Always keep your home’s temperature at least at 55 degrees. Add insulation to the pipes if they feel cold to the touch.

Home maintenance is considered a chore for a reason. Between work, taking care of the kids, and other cleaning that needs to be taken care of around the house, it often gets pushed to the side. It’s something that no one wants to spend their free time doing and can seem tedious. However, it can help cut energy costs and preserve your Home's Value the future. By doing regular, easy home maintenance tasks you can keep your Champaign/Urbana area home in tip top shape! Follow these Top 10 Tips for simple home maintenance.

  1. Do a Deep Clean

Perform a deep clean on everything inside of your house. Remove accumulated dust, dirt, and grime buildup throughout the rooms in your house. Clean appliances. Get rid of any mold and mildew buildup in rooms where moisture accumulates. Not only will this clean help your home looking its best but it will also allow to identify any potential problems in your house that might need further attention and repair.

  1. Clean Your Dryer Vent

A clogged dryer vent is one of the leading causes of house fires. Ensuring that this does not happen is incredibly easy to do! Along with cleaning out your dryer lint trap every time you use the dryer, you should regularly clear the dryer connection. The dryer connection is the tube/pipe that attaches the appliance to the outdoor vent. Pull the tube out and vacuum it clean of all the lint that has been accumulating within the pipe and the pipe connection. After cleaning it out, reattach the pipe to the dryer and make sure that it is properly connected.

  1. Clear Out Your Drains

No one wants to shower while standing in water up to your ankles. Make sure to keep your drains cleared out to avoid more serious problems such as a sewer backup. For less severe drain clogs, pouring boiling water down the drain can fix the issue. If that doesn’t fully clear it up, use a snake to remove the blockage. Always keep your plumber’s phone number handy if problems persist. Purchase a hair strainer to prevent the issue in the future.

  1. Replace Your Toilet Flapper

A leaky toilet tank can prematurely wear out the toilet and cause water damage to the bathroom floor. If you notice that your toilet is leaking, the flapper needs to be replaced. After turning off the water supply to the toilet using the valve in the back, empty the tank by flushing the toilet. Remove excess water left in the tank and the flush chain from the lever. You can then slide the existing flapper off and replace it with the new one. Reconnect the chain and turn the water supply back on.

  1. Fill Holes and Cracks in the Wall

There are very simple and cheap fixes to cover small holes and cracks in your drywall. A cosmetic sponge can be used to fill those holes. Cut it down to size, push it into the hole, and spackle over it. For those small cracks, add a bit baking soda to strong, fast acting glue and spread the mixture over the crack. This will create a strong surface that can easily be smoothed down by sanding it.

  1. Fix Your Windows

Avoid high energy bills by ensuring that your windows are keeping in the cold air or heat. With the cold winter months approaching in Illinois, you want to make sure that heat does not escape your home. Check the caulking around your windows. If there are any cracks or holes, remove the existing caulk with a box cutter and then apply a new line of it along the seam. To get a straight line of caulk, use painter’s tape. Remove the tape while the caulk is still wet. You can also fix a drafty window by applying an inexpensive insulating window film to the glass. Find a tiny hole in the glass? You can repair it with clear nail polish! Allowing the nail polish to dry in between applications, keep adding layers of the polish until it is flush with the glass.

  1. Get Rid of the Squeak Below Your Feet

Do you hardwood floors squeak when you walk of them? There is an easy fix for that. The culprit of the creak is moisture. Identify the floorboards that are creaking and sprinkle talcum powder on them. Take a makeup brush and sweep the powder in the cracks between the boards. This will help to soak up the moisture and remove the noise.

  1. Clean Your Fridge Coils

Your refrigerator is one of the items in your home that uses up the most energy. To help cut your utility costs, there is a simple fix. By vacuuming the coils underneath or in back of your fridge, you will keep it running as efficiently as possible.

  1. Inspect the Safety Features in Your Home

Make sure you and your family stay safe in your home by inspecting your fire extinguishers and smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. For the fire extinguisher, make sure that it is in an easily accessible spot, check for adequate pressure, and ensure that no wear and tear has occurred. For the smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, dust them off, ensure that they are working properly by pushing the test buttons, and replace batteries if necessary.

  1. Take Care of Your Gutters

Protect the exterior of your home and avoid more serious damage by regularly clearing your gutters of debris and buildup. If your home isn’t too tall, you can safely clean the gutters yourself by using a ladder. Remove all the muck that has been accumulating in the gutters. Then, take your garden hose to flush any remaining debris out and to make sure that water flows properly through them. If you notice that your gutters are sagging or pulling away from the house, replace the fasteners and hangers. As the leaves begin to fall this Autumn, it is important to make sure that your gutters are ready for any weather that comes our way. 

15 Native Plants for Gorgeous Champaign/Urbana Gardens!

by Rose Price

Spruce up the landscaping of your CHAMPAIGN/URBANA HOMES with a garden! After those long winter months, gardens are a great way to add a bit of color and cheer to your yard. You can ensure gardening success during the warmer seasons by turning to plant varieties that naturally grow throughout the Midwest. As an added bonus, native plants require less maintenance. Here are the 15 top native plants for Midwestern gardens!

 

SPIDERWORT (Tradescantia sp) – These perennials will blossom with three-petaled flowers in the spring. They can be placed anywhere throughout your garden, whether in the sun or the shade.

 

SWAMP MILKWEED (Asclepias incarnata) – Attract monarch butterflies to your garden in the summer with these pink beauties. As an added bonus, this resilient plant can thrive in average growing soil.

 

COMPASS PLANT (Silphium laciniatum) – Growing up to 9 feet tall, this stunning plant blooms yellow, sunflower-like petals. Interestingly, the Compass Plant naturally aligns itself north to south allowing it to conserve water throughout the summer.

 

WILD ANEMONE (Anemone canadensis) – Add a lovely border to your garden in the spring with Wild Anemone. This plant grows easily in moist soil and will blossom with lovely, large white flowers.

 

PALE PURPLE CONEFLOWER (Echinacea pallida) – With pale pink petals and dark red cones this beauty adds color to your garden in the summer. It will naturally spread across areas of your garden due to the fact that it will self-seed.

 

BLOODROOT (Sanguinaria canadensis) – For shady areas of your garden, plant the Bloodroot. In early spring, there will be beautiful white flowers arranged in the shape of a pawprint. By summer, however, the plant's cycle has ended.

 

JACK-IN-THE-PULPIT (Arisaema triphyllum) – Since the Bloodroot goes dormant in the summer, plant Jack-in-the-Pulpit in the same area to maintain interest throughout your garden despite the season. Also thriving in shaded areas, this unique green flower is hooded and reveals little red markings inside. In the fall, red berries also appear for continued color.

 

BUTTERFLY WEED (Asclepias tuberosa) – This resilient plant resists droughts, disease, and pests! Its beautifully bright orange flowers attract butterflies in the summer months.

 

LITTLE BLUESTEM (Schizachyrium scoparium) – This native grass will add beauty to your garden all year round! In the spring and summer, the foliage is blue-green. Starting in the fall and lasting throughout the winter, this plant turns a stunning purple-bronze.

 

POPPY MALLOW (Callirhoe involucrata) – A perfect addition to the front of your garden, this low growing plant blossoms with wine colored flowers. It can grow in dry soil, lasts several seasons, and resists pests!


PENSTEMON (Penstemon digitalis) – Returning every year to your garden in the summer, the Penstemon grows up to 2 feet tall and blossoms white flowers among its burgundy colored leaves.

 

COLUMBINE (Aquilegia canadensis) – Hummingbirds and butterflies will flit among your garden when you add this plant. These delicate yellow and red flowers will flourish in the shade or sun.

 

CULVER'S ROOT (Veronicastrum virginicum) – Make sure to always water the Culver's Root. These white flowers will grow in light shade and attract butterflies.

 

GOLDENROD (Solidago sp) – Keep your garden looking lovely throughout the fall with this plant. The golden-yellow clusters of flowers need full sun and well-drained soil.

 

BLUE SAGE (Salvia pitcheri) – Add this perennial to your garden for a splash of lovely sky blue in the early fall. Blue Sage thrives in growing conditions similar to the Goldenrod.

 

Adding these beautiful blooms to your landscape and gardens, along with stones, ponds and other accents add value to your homes and instant curb appeal! If you're thinking of selling your Champaign/Urbana home, this is one of the areas to plan on spending a little money before putting your home on the market!

 

For more Home Selling Tips  visit my website at http://www.champaignrose.com or call my office to speak with me personally about your home!

Resource: Better Homes & Garden July 2016

Spring Yard & Gardening Tips for Champaign IL!

by Rose Price

Ok, it’s been a weird spring; sunny and beautiful one day and the next snow, but here in Champaign/Urbana IL, we’re used to it and Summer is right around the corner, we promise. 

Your plants are no doubt confused; do they wake from winter slumber or wait? If they wake up, they’re usually damaged with a late freeze.   So, wait just a little longer before planting those seedlings.  There is plenty to do in the meantime.  

Check Your Tools

Chances are your tools were packed away hastily in the fall, so take this opportunity and use it for a little maintenance.

  •  Get your gas-powered equipment a tune-up: Sharpen the mower blades, change the spark plugs, replace the fuel, get some new oil, and double check to make sure everything is still working properly. 
  •  Sharpen and oil hand equipment: Sand any rust with a bit of steel wool, use a sharpening stone to sharpen the edge of the blades, and then coat the blades and moving parts with a light penetrating oil. (Local hardware stores usually offer these services as well). 
  •  Repair Digging tools: Did you break the handle on a shovel last year?  If it’s a quality tool, it’s worth replacing the handle, rather than throwing it out and buying a new one. Again, scrub off the rust and dirt and then spray with a penetrating oil to fight rust this season. 
EXTRA:
Soak your rusted tools in a bucket of white vinegar for fifteen minutes.  Remove and wipe dry.  Soak for an additional 15-30 minutes, remove and then brush with your steel wool.  Repeat until all rust is removed.  After rust is removed, dry completely and rub with linseed or mineral oil.  After this dries, put a little penetrating and your tools will be primed and ready for work.  

Prepare The Yard

Winter has a special way of making your yard look like a dirty post apocalyptic movie set, sticks and debris scattered, dead leaves and grass everywhere, maybe some land mines from the neighbors dog.  So before you get to planting, you’ll need to do some clean-up and a bit of TLC.  Spring flowers won’t hide everything.

  •  Rake: Rake all of the dead leaves and add them to your compose pile. Collect all the sticks and kick em to the curb for pick up. 
    Rake up all of your old mulch and add it to the leaves in the compost pile.  Spread a ½-inch layer of finished compost over all the bare soil in your beds to replace lost nutrients.
  •  Time To Primp: Pull out your annuals that died over the winter and, guess what?…yup put them in the compost pile! Any perennials and ornamental grasses that weren’t cut back in fall should now be cut to about 4 inches tall to make way for new growth; saw off all broken branches to the larger branch they’re attached to, make sure to leave a smooth cut rather than a little stub; prune all trees, shrubs, and vines to remove dead wood and if you didn’t get to it over the winter, now is your last chance to prune fruit trees, grape vines and other food plants. 
  •  Finishing Touches: Sculpt your flower beds with an edging tool to obtain clean, crisp lines and keep lawn grass from invading your beds.  Cut early spring blooms to make way for better ones.   

Prepare Your Veggie Beds

When the soil in your vegetable garden is finally dry enough to not squish when you step on it, it’s time to start laying the groundwork.

  •  Clean: Remove any dead leftovers that didn’t survive the winter and toss them into your growing compost pile; if you planted cover crops in the fall, mow them and then let the stems dry out for a couple weeks before tilling the debris; if you mulched your beds in the fall, rake off the mulch and add it to the compost pile.
  •  Add More Compost: Spread a new layer of compost on your beds—1 to 2 inches is best, and till; add extra nutrients like lime (for acidic soils), sulfur (for basic soils), bone meal (for phosphorus), green sand (for potassium), and kelp meal (for micronutrients), then till in the compost and  extras but only once the soil is dry enough to crumble when you grab a handful, then rake the beds into smooth, ready-to-plant mounds.
  •  Sort Your Seeds: Pick out your seeds, sort and then get some started indoors!

Thanks Modern Farmer for the great Gardening information!

 

10 Fall Maintenance Projects for your Champaign IL Home

by Rose Price

1. Time to Stow that Mow...errrrr!

Two Words: Fuel Stabilizer.  If your mower sits for months with gas in the tank, it will start to deteriorate and damage the internal parts of the engine.  You can protect from this with a $10 bottle of stabilizer.  This way, you can keep your mower in good condition over the winter.

Another mower tip is to cool and remove the spark plug the pour a capful of engine oil into the spark plug hole. After, pull the starter cord a couple times to distribute the oil.  This will keep the pistons lubricated and ensure an easy start in the springtime. Lastly, turn the mower on its side and clean out the grass and debris from the mower deck, finish and stow. Goodnight Mower til spring!

2.  Secure your hoses..

Remove garden hoses from outdoor faucets. Leaving hoses attached can cause water to back up in the faucets and plumbing.  Doing this can result in cracked pipes, water damage and lots of "green" spent on your end! Don't gamble with the weather. If the water does freeze and expand...it's already too late.

3. Give your sprinklers a long break

Drain your irrigation systems.  Even deep buried systems can freeze, which again, leads to broken pipes and sprinkler heads. It's pretty simple:

Turn off the water to the main valve, then shut off the automatic controller. Once complete open the drain valves to remove water from the system. Once you've drained the water completely from the system, remove any above ground sprinkler heads and shake the water out.  If you don't have valves, then you may need to hire a pro to blow out the pipes with compressed air.  It may cost you a little bit of money, but it's well worth the time & money spent!  

4. Caulk your Cracks

Purchase a couple of tubes of colored caulk to match your exterior color then walk around your home and seal the cracks between the trim, window frames, door frames, and entry points of cables, pipes & vents. This is one of the simplest and most important jobs you can do to ensure you're not wasting energy this winter.

5. Get your head in the Gutter!

Clogged rain gutters may be one of the jobs you dread most, but they can be one of the costliest repairs if left undone. These can cause ice dams to form which often lead to expensive repairs, not just at the gutters & roof, but the attic, ceilings of your rooms and even the walls and floors!  So make this a priority; After all the leaves have fallen, remove the leaves, and other debris- including the gunk that forms from the gutters and flush them out with a hose. Make sure your gutters aren't sagging; tighten gutter hangers and downspouts.  If you find any colored sand or grit it is most likely from your shingles.  If you find enough of this, it may be time to replace the roof or at the very least have it inspected by a professional.  Click here for Recommended Roofers in Champaign/Urbana

*Your downspouts should extend at least 5 feet from your home to prevent foundation problems

6. Raise the roof!

Look for warning signs of damage or any loose or missing shingles.  If shingles are missing, you should replace immediately.  Black algae stains are normal, but masses of moss could be a sign that a roof is decaying underneath.  If you do find moss, call a roofer for an evaluation. 

You'll also want to check your plumbing vent stack, which is usually lined with a rubber collar (called a boot) that may crack or loosen.  They will definitely wear out before your roof does.  So check it annually to ensure it's not cracked or loose.

7. Drains

Look at the soil around your foundation and make sure it slopes away from your home at least 6 vertical inches and ideally over ten feet away.  This way, you'll keep water from soaking the soil around the foundation, which often leads to cracks and leakage.   

8. Check your furnace

Schedule an appointment with a heating and cooling professional before winter. These checks should take place annually.  Make sure to check the filters, which should be replaced every 2 months. If your HVAC includes a humidifier, make sure to replace this filter as well. Remember, Carbon Monoxide poisoning is a silent killer. Don't put your lives at risk! Get your HVAC checked at regular intervals.

 

9. Prune the plants

Late fall is the best time to prune your plants.  The goal is to keep branches 3 feet from your house, so moisture doesn't continually drip on your roof and home during the winter and damage your home.  

10. Check your fireplace

This is important for safety.  Grab a flashlight and take a peek inside.  Make sure the damper opens and closes properly.  Look into the flue to make sure it's free of birds, nests, branches and any other obstructions.  Check for missing or cracked bricks and replace damaged ones immediately. Next check for creosote buildup and clean your chimney thoroughly. Because creosote is a dangerous & highly flammable substance, using a certified Chimney Sweep is highly recommended.   

 

 More Winterizing Tips Below  

For more Home Maintenance Tips give me a call or visit my website at www.champaignrose.com.

 

Get Your Champaign IL Home Ready For Fall

by Rose Price

It may seem like summer has just ended, but before we know it, the blustery winds and  cooler temperatures of Fall will be upon us. Now is the best time to prepare your home for the change of seasons, before the actual change begins. Just think of the cash you will save by taking care of the weatherizing of your home now. Here are a few area's to check out on your home:

Raise the Roof

Few home problems are more frustrating than a leaky roof, as it’s often hard to find the exact source of the problem.  So, taking care of these things before the rain and snow begin is a good idea. 

Inspect your roof from top to bottom, searching for missing or damaged shingles. Check shingles for cracks and other damage. Look for damage to metal flashing around vents and chimneys. Look in your gutters. If you find large granules, it could be a sign that you are losing your roof’s coating. Finally, make sure your gutters are flowing freely of any type of debris; leaves, sticks, sludge from rains and storms throughout the summer months.

Get your mind IN the Gutter

The drainage system on your roof is extremely important, as it diverts thousands of gallons of water from your home annually, protecting your foundation and walls. Obviously you want to keep these drains flowing smoothly.  Clogged gutters lead to basement flooding and other hard to detect damage.  They are not immune from rust and erosion, so you need to keep them cleaned out, especially BEFORE the Fall leaves start falling into them. Once they have been cleaned, we'd recommend using a mesh guard over the top to protect them from future debris, and it makes keeping them clean  & your job, a whole lot easier!  

Hunt your Home for Drafts

Many homes have air leaks around windows and doors, which can account for an increase of  10% in your energy bill (according to the U.S. Department of Energy).  So, check for gaps in caulk and weather stripping.  If you don’t have weather stripping…you’re missing out!  Seriously, weather-stripping is by far the most cost-effective way to control heating and cooling costs. It will reduce drafts and keep your home comfy cozy year round.  However, this stuff can deteriorate over time, so even if you already used it, you want to inspect it annually.  

There are a couple easy techniques for checking your stripping:

  • 1) Close your door or window on a strip of paper…if the paper slides up and down easily, you have some work to do.
  • 2) Light a candle and hold it near the frame of the closed door or window…if you find the flame flickers at any point near the frame…you have a leak!

You’ll also want to check your caulking, especially near entry points for cables.  This can also deteriorate over time, so look for area's you may have to re-caulk.  

Brrr.....It's Getting Chilly!

Winter is coming, and we all must protect our pipes or deal with a very messy & expensive aftermath! Close any shut-off valves to outdoor faucets…then drain the water line, by opening the valve outside.  

*If you don't have shut-off valves or your faucets are not "freeze-proof “, you may benefit from styrofoam faucet covers sold at home centers.

In-ground irrigation systems should come with instructions from the manufacturer on how to freeze proof. 

Where’s your Filter?

Furnace filters trap dust that would otherwise be deposited around your home.  Clogged filters also make it harder to keep your home at a comfortable temperature, and can seriously increase your utility bills. It’s easy to manage by a simple monthly cleaning to keep the filters breathing free and clear.

Disposable filters can be vacuumed once before replacement. Foam filters can also be vacuumed but these don't need to be replaced unless they are damaged. Use a soft brush on a vacuum cleaner. If the filter is metal or electrostatic, remove and wash it with a firm water spray.  Boom, your filter is good as new.

Professional Help

It's a good idea to have your Heating System inspected by a professional once a year. People often wait until the last minute, so beat the rush and schedule this for the early fall, before the heating season even begins.  Here are some of the signs that your Heating Systems isn't functioning properly:    

  • Noisy belts Weird screeches or whines may signal that belts connected to the blower motor are worn or damaged.
  • Poor performance. A heating system that doesn't seem to work as well as it used to could mean a lot of different problems. Your heating ducts could be blocked, the burners might be misadjusted or the blower motor could be on its way out.  But before you panic, check that the filter is clean.   
  • Erratic behavior. This could be caused by a faulty thermostat.

Come on Baby Light your Fire

Even if you rarely use your fireplace, you should check it annually for damage. 

Inspect your flue for creosote. Creosote is a flammable by-product of burning wood, so if it accumulates in your chimney, you could be victim to a devastating fire. Have your chimney inspected annually for creosote buildup. If you use a fireplace frequently, then have the flue inspected after each cord of wood burned.

The best option is to have your entire chimney system inspected by a chimney sweep. Once you know what to look for, you can perform the inspection by shining a bright flashlight up the flue, looking for any deposits approaching 1/8 inch thick, though the actual cleaning of these deposits should be performed by a professional.  

  • Look for flue blockages. Birds love to nest at the top of an unprotected flue. A chimney cap is an easy way to prevent this.  If you don't have a cap, just take a look up the flu to be sure.
  • Exercise the damper. The damper is the metal plate that opens and closes the flu just above the firebox. Test the open and closed positions to ensure that it is working properly.
  • Check for damage. Make certain that the flue cap is in place. Inspect brick chimneys for loose or broken points. If access is a problem try using binoculars.

Keep your Humidifier Happy 

Really dry winter air is bad for your health, but did you know it can make fine wood crack easier? You and your home will feel more comfortable if you keep your Central Humidifier running properly. 

  • Inspect the plates or pads. You can clean them with laundry detergent. You should also rinse and scrape off mineral deposits (use a wire brush or steel wool). 

Gassy 

Anything involving gas is a huge safety issue.  Heaters that are not maintained properly can spew poisons into the air of your home, or at least it may be costing you more to operate. Have a professional check these devices annually. 

Smoke and CO Detectors 

Replace batteries in all of your smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) detectors. Then vacuum them with a soft brush attachment. Test the detectors by pressing the test button or holding a smoke source (like a blown-out candle) near the unit. If you haven't already, install a smoke detector on every floor of your home, including the basement.

Fire Extinguishers 

You’d be surprised how many homes don’t have a fire extinguisher.  Every home should have at least one fire extinguisher rated for all fire types (look for an A-B-C rating on the label). Keep one near the kitchen;  though having one per floor isn't a bad idea. Check the indicators on the pressure gauge to make sure the extinguisher is charged. Make sure the lock pin is intact and in place, and then make sure the discharge nozzle is not clogged.  

  • Fire Extinguishers should be replaced every 5 Years.
  • With every replacement, use a permanent marker to mark the date clearly on the new unit

​​For more Homeowner Tips and Fall Maintenance, visit my website and Facebook page. If you're looking to Buy or Sell a home in the Champaign/Urbana IL area in the fantastic Fall season, give me a call or stop in our office. You can contact me anytime at 217-202-8843 or view local homes at this link: Homes for Sale in Champaign IL.

Have a POWERFUL day!

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